BROWSE DEPARTMENTS


NEWLY ADDED


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Seiichi Hiroshima
Fukushima - Going Home
Seiichi Hiroshima
For Fukushima - Early Summer
Seiichi Hiroshima
For Fukushima - Late Autumn
Seiichi Hiroshima
For Fukushima - Hannya-shingyo I
Seiichi Hiroshima
For Fukushima - Hannya-shingyo II
Seiichi Hiroshima
Yaeyama dream II
Seiichi Hiroshima
Yaeyama dream
Seiichi Hiroshima
Sacred Mountains 7
Seiichi Hiroshima
for Fukushima - Together
Seiichi Hiroshima
Raven - Looking Straight
Seiichi Hiroshima
for Fukushima - Crescent Moon
Seiichi Hiroshima
For Fukushima - Dark Mountains
Jean Gumpper
Rose Hips
Jean Gumpper
Summer's End
Jean Gumpper
Grass
Jean Gumpper
Shimmer
Jean Gumpper
On Shore
Jean Gumpper
Elegy
Jean Gumpper
Unfolding Time
Jean Gumpper
Swedish Grass
Martin Lewis
Shadows, Garage at Night

EXHIBITIONS


Lee Chul Soo - Woodcuts

Below is a preview Lee Chul Soo's upcoming exhibition, please check back shortly for the complete selection of woodcuts.

As a farmer, Lee Chul Soo spends the warm months working the field across from his home and writing down the poetic observations that come to him about nature, politics, mortality, and morality. Once winter comes and crops have been harvested, Lee returns to his notes and creates these wonderful woodcuts inspired by the poetry. This exhibition features more than thirty new works.

The Northwest School

A selection of works on paper from the Northwest School and their contemporaries

Beginning in the 1930s-40s, the movement's early participants Guy Anderson, Kenneth Callahan, Morris Graves and Mark Tobey combined natural elements of the Puget Sound area with the mid-century Modernist aesthetic to create a novel and distinct regional style.  Diffuse lighting, earthy tonal ranges, and local signs and symbols in the work of Northwest School artists further earned them the enduring  label of mystics. Their work became recognized nationally when LIFE published a 1953 feature article on them, and was largely interpreted as a spiritual interpretation of Northwest life. Although most denied being a "school" of art, they did know and influence one another and younger artists in a style that would emerge to be uniquely Northwest.